Responding in Peaceful and Positive Ways

Program description

Responding in Peaceful and Positive Ways provides a lesson-based approach to SEL. It includes programming for grades 6-8 and demonstrates evidence of effectiveness in grades 6-7.

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    • Onsite in-person training
    • Virtual training
    • Offsite training
    • Train the trainer model
    • Administrator support
    • Coaching
    • Technical assistance
    • Professional Learning Communities (PLCs)
    • Online resource library
    • Self-report tools for monitoring implementation
    • Observational tools
    • Tools for measuring student success

Evidence of effectiveness

Results from a randomized control trial (RCT) evaluation conducted in 1995-1996 academic year (published in 2001) supported the effectiveness of the RIPP program for secondary school students. The evaluation included 626 students in grade 6 (Black = 96% as per school records) across 3 public schools in an urban setting in the southeast. This evaluation found that students receiving the RIPP program self-reported significantly fewer cases of disciplinary violations and in-school suspensions than the control group (controlling for pretest).

Results from a quasi-experimental (QE) evaluation published in 2002 supported the effectiveness of the RIPP program. The evaluation included 161 grade 6 students (White = 24%, Latinx = 61%) in one school in rural Southeastern US. The study found that students who received the program self-reported significantly lower instances of problem behavior – physical aggression and drug use – as compared to the control group at post intervention (accounting for pretest).

A quasi-experimental (QE) evaluation conducted in 1998-1999 and 1999-2000 academic years (published in 2003) supported the effectiveness of the Responding in Peaceful and Positive Ways (RIPP) program for middle school students. The evaluation covered 1,340 students in grades 6-7 (Black = 11%, White = 65%, Hispanic = 22%; 66% eligible for FRPL; 29% were children of migrant workers; 32% students were from households where English was not the primary language). The study found that students who received the program self-reported significant reduction in problem behavior and a sustained positive impact on their life satisfaction on follow-up (reported 4 and 9 months after intervention) as compared to students in the control group (controlling for pretest).

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  • Evidence shown in grades
    6, 7
    School characteristics
      • Rural
      • Urban
      • Southeast
    Student characteristics
    • Black / African American
    • Hispanic / Latinx
    • White
    • Low income
    Percentage Low Income
    • Eligible for FRPL: 66%
    • Improved academic performance
    • Reduced emotional distress
    • Improved identity development and agency
    • Reduced problem behaviors
    • Improved school climate
    • Improved school connectedness
    • Improved social behaviors
    • Improved teaching practices
    • Improved other SEL skills and attitiudes

References

  • Accepted by CASEL
  • Farrell, A. D., Meyer, A. L., & White, K. S. (2001). Evaluation of Responding in Peaceful and Positive Ways (RIPP): A school-based prevention program for reducing violence among urban adolescents. Journal of clinical child psychology, 30(4), 451-463.

  • Farrell, A. D., Valois, R. F., & Meyer, A. L. (2002). Evaluation of the RIPP-6 violence prevention program at a rural middle school. American Journal of Health Education, 33(3), 167-172.

  • Farrell, A. D., Valois, R. F., Meyer, A. L., & Tidwell, R. P. (2003). Impact of the RIPP violence prevention program on rural middle school students. Journal of Primary Prevention, 24(2), 143-167

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