Teen Outreach Program

Get info and pricing on the provider’s website

Go to Provider Site
Program description

The Teen Outreach Program, offered by Wyman National Network, provides a lesson-based approach to SEL. It includes programming for grades 6-12 and demonstrates evidence of effectiveness in grade 7 as well as grades 9-12. Translated materials for the Teen Outreach Program are available in Arabic, Bulgarian, Chinese (traditional and simplified), Czech, Danish, Dutch, French, Icelandic, Konkani, Korean, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese (Brazil and Portugal), Russian, Slovak, and Spanish. If you are looking for a program designed for small groups of high school aged youth across 12-14 weeks, consider Wyman’s Teen Connection Project (TCP).

Strategies supporting educational equity

The Teen Outreach Program provides strategies for customizing for context and youth action projects. This includes intentional exploration and guidance around how the program could fit within the context of a school district or community. Additionally, the program includes opportunities for students to create and implement community service learning that includes youth voice and choice.

/
      • SEL lessons
      • Instructional practices
      • Relationship building
      • SEL generalization
      • Shared agreements
      • Student voice
      • Service-learning
      • Community partnerships
      • Community volunteer activities
    • Onsite in-person training
    • Virtual training
    • Offsite training
    • Train the trainer model
    • Administrator support
    • Coaching
    • Technical assistance
    • Professional Learning Communities (PLCs)
    • Online resource library
    • Self-report tools for monitoring implementation
    • Observational tools
    • Tools for measuring student success

Evidence of effectiveness

Results from a randomized control trial conducted between 1991 through 1995 (published in 1997) supported the effectiveness of Wyman’s Teen Outreach Program for high school students. This evaluation included 695 diverse students in grade 9 through 12 across 25 sites in the US (Black = 67%, Latinx = 11%, White = 19%). The study found that high school students who participated in the program were less likely to report failing a course, being suspended, or becoming pregnant compared to students in the control group (outcomes reported 9 months after baseline while controlling for outcome pretest, and socio-demographic characteristics of students).

Results from a quasi-experimental evaluation conducted in 2012 (published in 2016; McBride et al.) supported the effectiveness of Wyman’s Teen Outreach Program for middle school students. This evaluation included 218 grade 7 students enrolled in in an urban setting in the US Midwest (Black = 87%; eligible for FRPL = 81%). The study found that students in grade 7 who participated in the program were less likely to self-report failing grades and skipping classes compared to students in the comparison group (outcomes reported 9 months after baseline while controlling for outcome pretest).

Results from a randomized control trial conducted in the 2012-2013 school year (published in 2016; Walsh-Buhi et al.) supported the effectiveness of Wyman’s Teen Outreach Program for high school students. This evaluation included 4,236 students (cohort 1) and 3,740 students (cohort 2) in grade 9 in the US Southeast (white =~ 60%, Latinx = ~20%, Black = ~10%). The study found that students who participated in the program were less likely to have engaged in risky sex behaviors (cohort 1) and have less risky sex intentions (cohort 2) compared to students in the control group (outcome reported 9 months after baseline, analyses controlled for outcome pretest and student demographic covariates). These associations were particularly strong for female students compared to male students.

Results from a randomized control trial conducted in the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 school years (published in 2019) supported the effectiveness of Wyman’s Teen Outreach Program for high school students. This evaluation included 3,836 students in grade 9 and 10 (white =~ 60%, Latinx = ~20%, Black = ~10%). The study found that students who participated in the program were less likely to have engaged in risky sex behaviors compared to students in the control group (outcome reported 9 months after baseline, analyses controlled for outcome pretest and student demographic covariates). This association was particularly strong for female students compared to male students. A follow up study in the spring of 2014 found that students who participated in the program were less likely to report being pregnant/getting someone pregnant compared to students in the control group (controlled for outcome pretest and student demographic covariates).

/
  • Evidence shown in grades
    7, 9, 10, 11, 12
    School characteristics
      • Urban
      • Northeast
      • Southeast
      • Southwest
      • Midwest
      • West
    Student characteristics
    • Black / African American
    • Hispanic / Latinx
    • White
    • Low income
    Percentage Low Income
    • Eligible for FRPL: 81%
    • Improved academic performance
    • Reduced emotional distress
    • Improved identity development and agency
    • Reduced problem behaviors
    • Improved school climate
    • Improved school connectedness
    • Improved social behaviors
    • Improved teaching practices
    • Improved other SEL skills and attitiudes

How does Teen Outreach Program support SEL implementation across multiple settings?

“TOP promotes SEL through engaging curriculum lessons, experiential community service learning, and supportive relationships with caring, trained adults. The program is designed to meet adolescent developmental needs and can be implemented in a variety of settings, including: in-school, after-school, and through community organizations.”

Get info and pricing on the provider’s website

Go to Provider Site

References

  • Accepted by CASEL
  • Allen, J. P., Philliber, S., Herrling, S., & Kuperminc, G. P. (1997). Preventing teen pregnancy and academic failure: Experimental evaluation of a developmentally based approach. Child Development, 68(4), 729-742

  • Daley, E. M., Marhefka, S. L., Wang, W., Noble, C. A., Mahony, H., Arzola, S., … & Marwah, E. (2019). Longitudinal evaluation of the Teen Outreach Programme: Impacts of a health promotion programme on risky sexual behaviours. Health Education Journal, 78(8), 916-930

  • McBride, A. M., Chung, S., & Robertson, A. (2016). Preventing academic disengagement through a middle school-based social and emotional learning program. Journal of Experiential Education, 39(4), 370-385

  • Walsh-Buhi, E.R., Marhefka, S.L., Wang, W., Debate, R., Perrin, K., Singleton, A., Noble, C.A., Rahman, S., Maness, S.B., Mahony, H., Ziemba, R., Malmi, M., Marwah, E., Hall, K., Turner, D., Blunt-Vinti, H., Noble, S.M., Daley. E.M. (2016). “The impact of the Teen Outreach Program on sexual intentions and behaviors.” Journal of Adolescent Health, 59(3), 283-290

Access the latest, most trusted information on SEL

Sign up for our newsletters