The Leadership Program’s Violence Prevention Project (VPP)

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Program description

The Leadership Program’s Violence Prevention Project, provides a lesson-based approach to SEL. It includes programming for grades 6-12 and demonstrates evidence of effectiveness in grades 6-10.

Strategies supporting educational equity

The Leadership Program’s Violence Prevention Project provides strategies for working with bias and youth action projects. This includes opportunities for educators to unpack their own biases and explore their identities as educators. Additionally, the program includes opportunities designed to support students’ understanding of their role as active, contributing, productive members of their community.

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      • SEL lessons
      • Instructional practices
      • Relationship building
      • SEL generalization
      • Shared agreements
      • Student voice
      • Adult SEL
      • Student Voice
      • Service-learning
      • Community partnerships
      • Activities and Resources for Home
    • Onsite in-person training
    • Virtual training
    • Offsite training
    • Train the trainer model
    • Administrator support
    • Coaching
    • Technical assistance
    • Professional Learning Communities (PLCs)
    • Online resource library
    • Self-report tools for monitoring implementation
    • Observational tools
    • Tools for measuring student success

Evidence of effectiveness

Results from a quasi-experimental evaluation conducted over four consecutive academic years from 2005-2009 (published in 2012) supported the effectiveness of the Violence Prevention Project for middle school students. This evaluation included 2,597 grade 6 through 8 students enrolled in Title 1, urban schools in the US Northeast (Black/African American = 36%, Hispanic/Latinx = 47%). This evaluation found that middle students receiving the program experienced significantly less steep decreases in peer supportive behaviors and less steep increases in verbally aggressive behaviors strategies and normative beliefs about aggression compared to control students. Students also experienced significant declines in their physically aggressive and antisocial behaviors conflict resolution strategies compared to control students (outcomes reported approximately 12 weeks after baseline while controlling for outcome pre-test).

Results from a quasi-experimental evaluation (published in 2014) supported the effectiveness of the Violence Prevention Project for high school students. In sum, these evaluations included 793 grade 9 and 9 students enrolled in Title 1, urban schools in the US Northeast (Black/African American = 41%, Hispanic/Latinx = 42%). This evaluation found that high schools students receiving the program experienced significant declines in their verbal aggression and immature avoidance conflict resolution strategies, as well as less attenuated inclines their antisocial conflict resolution strategies, compared to control students (outcomes reported approximately 12 weeks after baseline while controlling for outcome pretest).

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  • Evidence shown in grades
    6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    School characteristics
      • Urban
      • Northeast
    Student characteristics
    • Black / African American
    • Hispanic / Latinx
    • Low income
    Percentage Low Income
    • Eligible for FRPL: 40%
    • Improved academic performance
    • Reduced emotional distress
    • Improved identity development and agency
    • Reduced problem behaviors
    • Improved school climate
    • Improved school connectedness
    • Improved social behaviors
    • Improved teaching practices
    • Improved other SEL skills and attitiudes

How does The Leadership Program’s Violence Prevention Project (VPP) support SEL implementation across multiple settings?

“The Leadership Program's curriculum is steeped in leadership development from an SEL perspective, taking participants through self discovery, group awareness, and community impact. The program can be used in classrooms, after school settings, and at home. It includes project-based activities designed to support positive change in the schools, homes, and communities.”

Get info and pricing on the provider’s website

Go to Provider Site

References

  • Accepted by CASEL
  • Chauveron, L. M., Thompkins, A. C., & Harel, O. (2012). Urban youth violence prevention: effectiveness of a scaled-up practice-to-research programme. Journal of Children’s Services, 7, 246-261.

  • Thompkins, A. C., Chauveron, L. M., Harel, O., & Perkins, D. F. (2014). Optimizing violence prevention programs: An examination of program effectiveness among urban high school students. Journal of School Health, 84, 435-443.

  • Other references
  • Chauveron, L.M. & Thompkins, A.C. (2010). The Leadership Program’s Violence Prevention Project: A supplementary review of implementation fidelity from 2005-2006 through 2008-2009. Report for the National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices.

  • Chauveron, L.M. & Thompkins, A.C. (2012). Urban conflict resolution: An evidence-based approach. Journal of Youth Development, 7(2), 40-47.

  • Thompkins, A.C., & Chauveron, L.M. (2010). The Leadership Program’s Violence Prevention Project: Examining program effectiveness among early and middle adolescents. Report for the National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices.

  • Thompkins, A.C. & Chauveron, L.M. (2010). The Leadership Program’s Violence Prevention Project: A supplementary report on measurement reliability and validity. Report for the National Registry of Evidence Based Programs and Practices

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